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Home | News | Government (page 3)

Fannie Is Eyeing the Future Conservatively

Fannie Mae’s newest look at the economy over the next year-and-a-half is a positive, if not bullish one. The GSE sees housing as a major driver of the economy, but not at such a pace as to cause any bubbles. At the same time, potential political unrest domestically and internationally bring the enthusiasm down to a much quieter level.

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Carson: HOME, CDBG May Continue Under New Names

HUD Secretary Ben Carson set many Americans at ease recently, when he said parts of the HOME program, the Community Development Block Grant, and other HUD initiatives may continue—even if President Trump’s latest budget proposal moves through. The proposal opens HUD up to HUD would be on the receiving end of $6.2 billion in budget cuts. At a press conference, Carson offered reassurance that parts of the programs—the ones that “are functioning well” will be preserved in some form.

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Reforming Dodd-Frank to Unify the U.S. Economy

“For seven years now, the Dodd-Frank Act has stifled the American Dream—for half of the country,” said U.S. Representative David Kustoff (R-TN) in an opinion piece on CNBC. According to Kustoff, Dodd-Frank requires rolling back, and it has caused plenty of harm since then. Though it saved plenty of big banks during the recession, its regulation has stifled many smaller banks.

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CFPB Offers Clarification to Proposed Data Collection Update

In fall of 2015, the CFPB introduced new data reporting requirements which are set to take effect next year under the 1974 Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA), updating existing rules which will make lenders provide information on property value, the terms of the loan, the term of prepayment penalties and the duration of teaser or introductory interest rates. However, the increased amount of data which the CFPB requires lenders to report has led increased complications.

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Fannie Mae Announces Reperforming Loan Sale Winner

Fannie Mae announced the results of its second reporforming loan sale transaction. The deal was previously announced on March 14, and consisted of 7,600 loans totaling $1.65 billion in unpaid principal balance (UPB). All four loan pool were won by DLJ Mortgage Capital, Inc., and the transaction is expected to close on May 25.

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Hensarling Discusses How to Bring Accountability to the CFPB

“The most powerful and least accountable Washington bureaucracy in history” is what Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling called the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in a blog post on Tuesday. In the post, Hensarling acknowledges the bureau’s important mission, but notes the shortcomings that it has faced.

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Supreme Court Judge Refuses To Reopen Credit Suisse Suit

A New York State judge refused to reopen a dismissed lawsuit against a Credit Suisse AG unit, Law360 reports. New York Supreme Court Judge Eileen Bransten previously dismissed the case involving $1 billion in losses from faulty residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS), but new RMBS claims were not enough for U.S. Bank NA, a trustee for some RMBS pools, reopen the suit.

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Kashkari Responds to JPMorgan Chase CEO

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon stated in a letter to shareholders that the issue of “too big to fail” is solved. However, Minneapolis Federal reserve President Neel Kashkari disagrees. In an interview with Adam Shapiro on Fox Business that Too Big to Fail has not been solved, and is in fact worse.

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