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High End Retail Locations Indicating Hot Markets

As real estate agents say, “location, location, location”—and that means if you’re located near a Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s, according to research. After studying the areas both before and after the stores were built, researchers found neighborhoods that previously were appreciating at normal or below normal levels started appreciating rapidly after opening. Either they know how to pick neighborhoods, or people truly love to live near Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s.

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Lenders Loosen Risk Standards as Rates Rise

According to a new report, mortgage lenders are taking increased credit risks similar to those of the early 2000s, Released on Tuesday, the report shows that tThe level of credit risk taken by lenders in Q1 of 2017 was about the same as the average risk taken between 2001 and 2003. The shift is likely a result of declining refinances, rising mortgage rates, and an increased share of investor, condo, and co-op purchases.

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Closing of Interracial Gaps in Education Could Increase Homeownership

There are many factors that have affected homeownership rates after the 2008 financial crisis— specifically in regards to young adult social norms and changes in the housing market. The homeownership rate among 25- to 44-year olds has dropped 10 percent in the last decade and recent research shows this could be increased with closing the interracial gap in education and wealth. This research falls in line with statistics on diversity found in the corporate world.

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Current Costs of Living Effects Homebuyers Affording College Tuitions

Affording a comfortable lifestyle while saving enough money to send a child to college is a concern for the current homebuyer. The price of college is high and the cost of living in certain states directly impacts the chances of providing a child’s higher education. Recent data identifies the income needed to determine the cost of living securely and affording college tuition.

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Builder Confidence Shaky as Labor, Lot Shortages Continue

Home builders are plagued with labor and lot shortages, and it’s causing their confidence in the single-family market to waver, according to new data released this week. Overall, builder confidence in the single-family residential market has dropped by two points in June. Single-family production fell 3.9 percent for the month of May, while multifamily construction dropped 9.7 percent. Overall, housing starts declined 5.5 percent across the nation.

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Price Gap Widens Between Priciest, Most Affordable Metros

According to a new report issued on Friday, home price appreciation rates are disparate between the nation’s most and least expensive cities—and that gap is only widening. While 16 percent of U.S. markets have seen housing prices jump 40 percent since the year 2000, another 30 percent of cities actually saw prices decline over the same period. Despite the discrepancy, nominal prices rose in 97 out of the nation’s 100 biggest metro areas last year due to high demand and tightening supply. As a result, affordability is on the downslope across the nation; an estimated 19 million households spent more than half of their income on housing.

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Tight Inventory Drives Apartment Demand Sky-high

As housing inventory continues to tighten, would-be homeowners are being driven toward renting—and the apartment market is struggling to keep up. According to a new study, the U.S. will need 4.6 million new apartments by 2030 in order to keep up with demand—or 325,000 every year. About 1 million new renter households were formed every year over the last five years. This steep jump is caused, in large part, by consumers delaying housing purchases. Aging and changes in consumer sentiment have also played a role, according to experts.

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Florida Carries Southern Region in Domestic Migration

Homeowners are flocking to Florida according to a recent market report. Nationally, quarter-over-quarter home price growth slowed slightly from 0.9 percent to 0.8 percent, but this aggregate measure is disguising a growing regional divide. The West, Northeast, South, and Midwest are broken down to month-over-month and year-over-year growth.

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